What plant is on your mind?

An area of The Sill dedicated to conversations about plants and gardening in the form of posted messages and threads.

New Post
 

Featured Topics

What plant is on your mind?

An area of The Sill dedicated to conversations about plants and gardening in the form of posted messages and threads.

New Post

Latest Greenery

  • Sanseveria cylindrica
    Hello all! I purchased this mama at the sill in NYC this past February and she’s been growing like crazy! As you can see there’s a baby trying to poke through and live it’s best life but the mama plant won’t let it. Should I cut the far right leaf off the mother plant so the baby can grow wild and free? Thanks in advance!!! 
      • 1
      Paris Lalicata Hi Jarilisse! I would recommend allowing the new growth to take it's course rather then removing the stalk above it. Overtime as the new shoot matures it should grow around the mother plant rather then remaining stunted. If you'd like, you can certainly re-position the plant a little so it's not hovering right over it but I truly don't see this as a problem :)
  • Orchid plant
    Hello plant enthusiasts and experts,
    i have a beautiful orchid plant that I have loved and cared for and it’s been re-blooming every year since I bought it a few years ago. This year, like always it did grow new stems and buds but the buds didn’t bloom. I see it is growing a new leaf right now. FYI I live in San Francisco, and keep my orchid indoors and it does get morning sun through the closed windows. I feel the top soil every time before I water it. What else... I have some miss on top soil to keep it moist
  • Monstera - Aerial Roots
    My Monstera is growing aerial roots- is it best to remove them or what do I do?
      • 2
      Paris Lalicata Hi Jessica! Aerial roots are commonly found on Epiphytes (plants that grow on the body of other plants or supports) and help the plant cling to these hosts and can even help absorb moisture in the air. Since the Monstera deliciosa is an epiphyte in the wild- indoors their aerial roots can insert themselves into the soil for more support, or climb up fixtures. Training your Monstera to climb up a damp sphagnum moss pole can help encourage the plant to grow faster and larger as this is how they grow in their native habitat! This will also help give the plant more support as it grows and overtime the aerial roots will start climbing up it. Therefor these are a natural characteristic of the plant so they shouldn't be removed :)
  • Cat Likes Parlor Palm as Snack
    Seeking advice to prevent my cat from eating the little parlor palm I got from The Sill a couple weeks ago. By now, virtually all leaves have been eaten off (the palm is the one on the left on photo, but this was taken when it first arrived). I have tried spraying the palm with a vinegar and water mixture, but this only works while still wet. I have had to move the palm to a high-up shelf, which is not ideal for the plant or us.
    Thanks for your help!
      • 1
      Pei What a view!!

      I personally find that having more cat grass at home kind of help. I've also tried mixing an essential oil with water, and spritz it immediately around the plant whenever my cats were about to enjoy the plants. The thing was that I had to be on the lookout and guard the plants for almost 7 days, and after that, they finally got the message. It's kind of like training your cats to not do things, ha.

      Best of luck!!
      • 1
      Paris Lalicata Hi Christina! The best way I know to keep your pets from snacking on your plants is to place them out of reach. Utilizing wall planters, hanging macramés, or any hanging basket that can be hung in front of a window. You can even use plant stands/side tables that are small and only large enough for the planter to prevent the cat from being provoked to jump on it. On a good note it looks like you have all pet friendly plants which aren't toxic if your cat were to ingest it, but I would also try teaching your cat to not go near the plants! My cats have responded well to just a spritz of water or saying "out" every time they get near a plant and start nibbling- now they don't even bother going near them anymore! (unless it's a new plant I bring home) Good luck :)
  • Propagating a leggy succulent
    Wanted to share my most recent propagation! I usually let leggy plants be but I was afraid this fella would break off because it was so small and fragile. Seems to be doing well and the leaves are starting to root. :) 
  • Help ID please
    Not sure what this is, please help if you know!
      • 1
      Paris Lalicata Hi Hayley! I am having a hard time identifying the plant but by it's characteristics I can help with some care tips. Since the foliage is variegated the plant is going to need plenty exposure to bright indirect light to maintain it's variegation and photosynthesize properly. Waxy, fleshy leaves are usually an indication that the plant is able to retain water better then thinner, papery leaves. Therefor I would try allowing the soil to dry out completely between waterings to see how the plant responds to avoid over watering- but if the plant droops before that point it'll be safe to give it a drink! Hope this helps :)
  • Transfer this Fiddle?
    Should I transfer her? She has definitely grown since I got her and I’m afraid to disrupt things since I haven’t had luck with Fiddles in the past. Thanks in advance 😊
      • 1
      Pei What a beauty 😍😍😍!

      When was the last time you repot it? I would definitely repot if it's been more than 1 year. Also it might get top heavy and the plant will topple over easily.
    • 1 more comment
  • Transfer to bigger pot?
    Is it time to transfer this girl? If so, what size pot? Thank you in advance. 
      • 1
      Pei It looks like the snake plant is still in the nursery pot and sitting in the white ceramic pot?
    • 1 more comment
  • Hoping to ID
    Anyone know what this plant is?
    Thanks!
      • 1
      Hayley Thank you!
      • 1
      Pei it's the baby tears!!
      • 1
      Paris Lalicata Hi [305518,Hayley]! It would be a little easier to ID for certain with a close up of the leaves, but from what I can tell this either looks like a Peperomia rotundifolia (round leaf peperomia) or a Soleirolia soleirolia (baby tears) to me!
  • Hoping to ID
    Hoping someone knows what this plants is.
    Thanks!
      • 1
      Hayley Thanks so much!!
      • 1
      Pei It looks like a repot might be needed btw!
      • 1
      Paris Lalicata Hi again [305518,Hayley]! This looks like a plant from the Dieffenbachia genus (dumb canes)!
  • Stagnant Rubber tree plant
    This plant has had the same leaves and the “shoot” in the center for MONTHS! It hasn’t grown or shed any leaves. I moved it about 2 months ago to a window that gets a little more sun, but nothing has changed. Should I fertilize? Thanks in advance for your suggestions. 😊
      • 1
      Pei I agreed with [286271,Paris Lalicata]. It's definitely an light issue. Ficus loves bright light - 4-5 hours of direct sun would be best. In addition, variegated plants will need even more energy (light) to put out new growths/maintain the variegation. Hope this helps :-)
      • 1
      Paris Lalicata Hi [305302,Patti]! I personally have had the same experience with Ficus elastica in the past and found that ultimately like most plants- it's all about the light! The new growth has most likely been in limbo either because it's not getting enough light or enough water (if light levels are sufficient). I can already tell by the drooping petioles that the plant is ready for a drink! If you're having a hard time understanding the intensity of light in your home you can always download a free light meter app on your phone to measure. Anything below 50 foot candles will be too low to support plant growth- and a mature Ficus of this size should get anywhere between 130-250+ foot candles. Keep in mind that you'll receive different readings at different times of the day based on the location of the sun and the intensity of it. As long as the plant receives plenty of bright indirect light and water as soon as the soil has dried out the new growth should start to unfurl within a few weeks!
    • 1 more comment
  • Weeping Philodendron 😢
    Help! I’ve had this beauty for about 2-3 months and recently the bottom leaves are dropping and slightly yellowish-brown. Do I trim them off? I read that if you overwater the plant the leaves will droop, is that true? Right now the plant is pretty dry I’m afraid to water it. The plant is facing a NW facing window so it gets afternoon sun. Any suggestions are appreciated. Thanks in advance. 
      • 1
      Paris Lalicata Hi again [305302,Patti]! Plants are often overgrown in the plastic nursery container they come in, therefor once the plant has acclimated into the home it's best to re-pot into a planter that is 1-2 inches larger. This ensures plenty of room for new growth- whereas if the plant is in a container that's too small for too long the foliage can gradually die back and that may be what's happening here. Moving forward I would transfer the plant into a slightly larger, more semi-permanent home and remove any dead plant material to enhance the appearance. As long as you give it plenty of bright indirect light and allow the soil to dry out between waterings this guy should bounce back in no time :)
  • I'm glad you pricked me!
    An indoor cactus likes nothing better then a good South facing window, and as you can tell I have definitely took advantage of mine! Did you know there is close to 2000 species of cacti out there in the world?! From desert, jungle, grafted, to hybrid species ranging from a diverse amount of colors, shapes, and structures.

    Care Guidelines to Follow:
    • Light is key! Make sure your cactus has plenty of exposure to full sun, or at least bright indirect light.
    • Best to only water once the soil has dried out completely, however, some jungle species may need to be watered when half the soil has dried out (considering they are from a more tropical region).
    • Tip: If your cactus is exposed to full sun for most of the day it'll be best to check the soil often to monitor how frequent it takes up water. As soon as it has dried out it'll be ready for a drink; although they may be drought tolerant they can certainly decline from too much sun and not enough water (especially smaller specimens).


  • Corn plant
    Hello, I’ve been struggling with my corn plant, I did overwater him I think but now every time I water him (2 weeks) he doesn’t look great. Hes in a corner of a room that gets a lot of light but no direct sun.
      • 1
      Paris Lalicata Hi [305279,Michelle M]! How far away is the plant from the light source? It seems like the plant may be declining due to low light levels. I would recommend downloading a free light meter app on your phone and measure the intensity of light hitting the plants leaf surface. This way you'll know what kind of light the plant is actually receiving in that part of the room. Anything below 50 foot candles is too low to support plant growth, and you'll notice the closer to the light source the higher the reading (and the happier the plant) will be!
  • White spots/pods on plants
    Does anyone know what these are? They are on the leaves of my banana plant and peony. And if yes, how can I fix it?? Thanks! 
      • 1
      Paris Lalicata Hi [303086,Callie]! If you look up "white scale" on google it looks like these resemble your uninvited guest, however, it's hard to confirm by the photo provided. If you believe this to be the case though and the infestation is low you can start by spot treating the plant. Using a q-tip/cotton pad dipped in alcohol or neem/horticulture oil will help get them off on contact. Although if they are armored scale they might have a hard time budging and picking them right off is sometimes easier. Afterwards I would then spray the entire plant down with an organic insecticide and monitor it over the next few weeks!