What plant is on your mind?

An area of The Sill dedicated to conversations about plants and gardening in the form of posted messages and threads.

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What plant is on your mind?

An area of The Sill dedicated to conversations about plants and gardening in the form of posted messages and threads.

New Post

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  • Snake plant has holes through its leaves
    Help! I got this snake plant for my boyfriend in May from the Sill and it was fine until about a month ago when it started developing holes in the leaves. When I got it originally it came with some damage from shipping (I assume) on the older leaves and that’s where the hole first started appearing. Neither of us are at his place very much (hence the snake plant since they’re pretty low maintenance) so I don’t know when this started exactly, but I noticed this week that it’s started getting holes on the leaves of the new growth, too!  I don’t see any evidence of bugs and the window it’s on gets lots of indirect light in the morning and early afternoon. My bf is really good about watering it only when it’s dried out so I’m not sure what could be wrong. Any ideas??
      • 1
      Paris Lalicata Hi Lakota! I agree with Erin looks like slug/snail damage! I'd say the quickest way to eradicate is to change out the soil with fresh soil, or leaching the planer with water and letting them drown out as long as you have a drainage hole
      • 1
      Erin Hi Lakota! Looked at this with some fellow plant friends and we think it could actually be slug or snail damage – especially if the spots are continuing to appear, and on new growth. Snails are nocturnal feeders so they'll be hiding out in the soil during the day and only come out at night to feed on the plant. They're totally harmless to humans, but to protect your snake plant you can try a few things:
      - They hate copper; you can try copper shavings around the base of the plant - They can't really crawl over sharp objects, so if you don't want to go out to buy copper bits, you could try crushed egg shells or coffee grounds
      OR, since they're hiding in the soil – you can change it out completely with fresh sterile soil! That would probably be the quickest way to get them outta there.
  • Cactus Support
    Not even sure what cactus this is. I somehow wasn't interested in it's classification when I got for Christmas at age seven. It's had what looks like a rotting trunk for as long as I can remember. We thought it was dead, but gave it the benefit of the doubt and moved it to a larger pot and it grew. Sometimes it seems to glow brighter and appears to be thriving well. Everything but the trunk, and you can see that I've used a make shift cane to support it. Otherwise it falls over under it top heavy weight. Can any anyone explain what's going on with my cactus and if there is anything I can do? 

    thanks! 
      • 1
      Russell Thanks two both insights! It has a couple of flowerings that could be propagated if I do enough research. Worse case it's too sentimental to not prop it up with chop sticks, random bark, or possibly strings somehow. I have a micro garden going in my food pantry. Most of the stuff there likes humidity, I might move one my grow lights to my dryer cactus dwelling bedroom if that helps. My mother and I were never much for botanist, so the poor cactus growth for this one is logical. I'll see what some extra carefully time watering can do. Thanks again!
      • 2
      Paris Lalicata Hi Russel! It looks like if there was ever an inconsistency with watering or lighting this could've caused the base to remain small. Since Cacti grow from the top and grow larger in diameter this is why you've seen the top get larger, but the base remain smaller. I would say if you give this Cactus optimal conditions- bright indirect light to full sun and water every time the soil dries out completely it should start to become a sturdier specimen. I would recommend keeping the support it has for now to prevent it from falling over. In the future if nothing changes and you're still unhappy with the look then I would recommend propagating the Cactus like Erin said by removing the top, letting is callous over, and then rerooting it! Cacti are really easy and fast to propagate :)
      • 2
      Erin This is a tough one! I've had this happen to a few of my cacti that received less light at the start, so their bases are super small, and they summer came or I moved them around my apartment - they received more direct light - and their new growth was much wider and healthier. With most of them I ended up chopping off that new top growth, propagating it, and tossing the base; but with the shape of this guy that would be hard to do. Do you mind the quirkiness? If you don't - I use chopsticks to prop mine up! You barely notice them.
  • Help with Peperomia- Broken Leaves
    Hi all! I just received my first plants, and the small peperomia I received has large tears near the stem of three leaves. Is there anything I should do? Should I prune them?

    Thank you!
  • Need help with my alocasia..
    I dont know what im doing wrong i need help fast.. 
      • 2
      Paris Lalicata Hi Teresita! Is the plant exposed to any cold drafts, sudden change in temperature, or is the soil cold (cold water used to water)? Usually when leaves start to display red/purply pigments it's usually due to change in temperatures, more so if they were to drop around the plant. The yellowing could also be a sign of excessive moisture. I would make sure the plant is in a warm environment in bright indirect light, and the soil is allowed to dry out between waterings!
  • Yellow Plant
      • 1
      Erin Whoa! This Schefflera is incredible. I agree with Paris below that the yellow looks like natural variegation. You might want to repot this babe eventually - its probably pot bound right now (roots overgrowing the pot).
      • 1
      Paris Lalicata Hi Raquel! Are the yellowing leaves on the plant actually dying back? Or are they still really healthy? It looks like the plant is variegating to me but if the leaves are yellowing and dropping from the plant it could be due to excessive moisture or becoming pot bound!
  • My plants are dying! Help please!
    My plants are dying. I had them since June. And they were fine until these past few weeks. I water them like i normally did, as told in the instruction that came with it when i bought them.
      • 1
      Paris Lalicata Hi Lloyd! What kind of light do the plants receive? Do you allow the soil to dry out completely to the bottom of the planters between waterings?
  • Identifying & Caring For This Plant
    Hello,
    Can someone please tell me what type of flowering plant this is and how to take care of it? It needs some TLC. Thank you :)
      • 1
      Paris Lalicata Hi Jo! I'm not the best at ID'ing flowers but usually if the blooms are dying back prematurely then it could be due to temps being too high around the plant. This could also be due to excessive moisture - if you believe this to be the case then I would let the soil dry out more between waterings!
  • Christmas Cactus roots
    Hi, this is my first post.  I have 2 beautiful Christmas Cactuses.  They are healthy, they bloom, they're huge and gorgeous.  Only thing: I wonder about their dirt/roots.  It looks really old and the plant "roots" (like the base of the plant that comes out of the dirt) is showing and I wonder if they need to be repotted.  They are old plants, maybe 7-10 years old.  I don't have a green thumb at all.  I'd hate to disrupt them unnecessarily and kill them.  I tried to attach a photo but was unsuccessful.  So I guess my question is; do you think it's ok to leave them alone as long as they are flourishing?  

    And what would be the symptoms when they DO need to be repotted? 

    Thanks, hope my question/s make sense.
      • 1
      Paris Lalicata Hi Sheri! Usually when a plant has become root bound in the container or the roots start poking out of the drainage hole it's time to repot. However, it's always best as well to repot plants annually since nutrients degrade in the soil overtime, and the overall quality of soil diminishes and becomes less absorptive. Usually for Christmas cacti however, they like becoming a little tight in their containers (this also helps promote blooming) and actually won't need to be repotted for every 2-3 years since Cacti are not heavy feeders. I would recommend aerating the soil at each watering to prevent the soil from becoming so compact which sounds like what may have happened here! It's hard to know what you're talking about without getting a visual, but if it's been more than 2-3 years and the plants pot bound I would repot into a container that is 1-2 inches larger with fresh soil!
  • Plant turning yellow
    I’ve had this plant for about 2 months. It’s on a windowsill with a good amount of light. Any ideas what could be causing this?
      • 1
      Paris Lalicata What exposure do you have this plant facing in? It looks like it could be a result of too much intense light, excessive moisture, or even if it's in a full shade environment. I would recommend ensuring the plants in a more filtered bright indirect light location, and allow the first few inches of soil to dry out between waterings!
  • ZZ plant
    Hello! I recently bought this plant last month. He’s dropped a ton of leaves and has a bunch of these green/yellow leaves, any thoughts?
      • 1
      Paris Lalicata Hi Michelle! It looks like overwatering to me- I would recommend either increasing the plants exposure to bright indirect light, or watering less frequently. Make sure you allow the soil to dry out complete between waterings. ZZ plants are very drought tolerant which makes them super sensitive to overwatering!
  • Identify plant?
    Can anyone identify this plant? It’s been growing like this since I got it over a year ago. 
  • Philodendron silver help
    order and potted this plant with a green philodendron. It came a little brown around the leaf edges and some of the cuttings were a bit shallow and had little roots but I figured that with a little time and adjusting from the shipping box and into the pot it would be adjust. After a few weeks it wasn’t dying more or reviving but I was watering once a week and then today I noticed a bright yellow fungus- looked it up and it’s dog slime mold? Anyone dealt with this? Or know why this happened? 
      • 1
      Paris Lalicata Hi Nashley! The yellow mushrooms on the soil looks like it could be Leucocoprinus birnbaumii. These are very commonly found growing in house plant soil and usually appears if the spores were to become present and given the right conditions. This is a perfectly natural occurrence when bringing the outdoors in, and even the natural mycorrhizal fungi that lives in the soil already can produce these mushrooms (mushrooms are referred to as the "Fruit of Fungi") if given optimal conditions in which to thrive.The only purpose the fungus serves is to break down dead organic matter in the soil and doesn't actually harm the plant! However, if the fungus is ingested by people or pets it can potentially be toxic. Moving forward, I'd recommend replenishing the plant with fresh sterile soil to prevent this from further developing and regenerating. You'll want to make sure you discard the plant soil, and sterilized any tools/your hands/container to rid of any spores that may have infected these items.
      • 1
      Nashley This is what the mold looks like
      X
      • 1
      Nashley This is what I’m seeing
      X
  • Marimo moss ball with tufts
    I bought my moss ball from The Sill about a year or so ago. For the past couple months, my moss ball has developed tufts and is uneven, instead of smooth and doesn't look too healthy. It's still a dark green instead of brown or black in parts. I clean the bowl it's in about once a week, use cold water from the tap, it's not in direct sunlight. I use soap to clean the rocks in the bowl, but I make sure that all the residue and the bubbles are gone before I put the moss ball back. 

    I'm not to sure how to fix this or if I can. Does anyone have an idea of what is happening? 
      • 1
      Paris Lalicata Hi Rhaeanne! I actually have a post on my profile all about Marimo moss ball care! Do you roll your moss ball at all? Or facilitate movement in its container? Considering these guys aren't naturally round and are cultivated this way they will begin to unravel overtime if not rolled around. Usually every time I give my moss fresh water I roll them around in my hand (similar to cookie dough) to maintain that shape. They will also develop those tufts or "bed sores" from being on one side for too long, so it'll be best to move it around so it's not sitting on one side too much and you should see an improvement!
  • Rattlesnake not doing well
    My plant does not stand erect anymore, and the soil always seems so moist. I’ve also noticed a lot of dry/dead? Leaves growing in. 
      • 1
      Paris Lalicata Hi Madison! If you notice the no leaf movement and the soil remaining moist for too long this is usually an indication that the plant isn't receiving enough light. I would recommend increasing the plants exposure to bright indirect light, and allowing the soil to dry out half way between waterings since daylight hours are decreasing!
  • Satin Pothos vs Silver Philodendron, Which do I own??
    Everything I read seems to give me a different answer. Once and for all what is the difference between a Satin Pothos and a Silver Philodendron, and which is in my kitchen (pictured)???
      • 2
      Paris Lalicata Hi Noelle! It looks like you have a beautiful Satin Pothos. Satin Pothos and the Silver Philodendron are very closely related, but are in fact two different species. If you look up google images online you'll notice that the Satin Pothos leaves are much larger, resembling the shape and size of a Pothos, but has larger variegated zones that blend into the foliage. Whereas the Silver Philodendron leaves are much smaller in size, a little more heart shaped, and the variegated zones are dispersed in blotches instead. While they both come from the same genus Scindapsus- the satin Pothos is known to be "Scindapsus pictus" while the Silver Philodendron is a form of the this being "Scindapsus pictus 'Argyraeus'". However, both of these plants used to be classified in the same genus "Epipremnum" which I believe is where all the confusion comes from, along with looking very similar. I believe they are both botanically listed as either a pothos or philodendron but neither, in fact, are actually the case and something that was simply implemented by the botanical world. The only way to tell the difference between Scindapsus and Epipremnum is to look at the seeds being produced if the plant happened to flower which is VERY rare for these guys indoors!