What plant is on your mind?

An area of The Sill dedicated to conversations about plants and gardening in the form of posted messages and threads.

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What plant is on your mind?

An area of The Sill dedicated to conversations about plants and gardening in the form of posted messages and threads.

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  • Mother Natures Garden
    While at first glance this may look like your classic excessive moisture symptom, after looking a little closer it actually appears to be quite the opposite. Considering the chlorosis is mainly present on the inter-veinal parts of the foliage I ruled this out to be a nutrient imbalance instead. Most likely deficient in either iron or manganese since the chlorotic areas are between the veins, while the veins themselves remain green. It's also common for manganese deficiency to cause dead spots and patches. How could this happen? I have a few theories:1. Excessive rainfall could've washed away the nutrients from the soil.2. Period of drought; plants need water present in order for the roots to extract available nutrients in the soil as soluble salts.3. Nutrient cycle above ground could've broke. Right next to this small group of plants was a very large tree that was clearly deceased, with only some growth left at the top (probably 60 feet up). Since nutrients can come from dead leaves, wood, and animal droppings that break down in the soil- the presence of this matter being significantly decreased could've contributed to these symptoms.
  • Bird of paradise trouble
    Hi! One of my bird of paradise stems started looking sad after a new growth turned brown half way through unfurling. This morning I was gently peeling off some old growth at the base when the whole stem snapped in half at the base (images included). I don’t know if this is caused by root rot or under watering. I’m pretty upset as it was the tallest stem in the plant and don’t want the rest of the plant to go down too!
    * I know the plant doesn’t get as much light as it ideally should so I supplement worth a happy lamp. 


  • Yellow bumps on Sansevieria Fasciata
    I inherited this neglected mother-in-law's tongue which has yellowish/brownish spots on one of the leaves. They go through the leaf, so on one side feel like depressions, and on the other feel like bumps. 

    Is this a problem, or something I should just leave be? The plant otherwise is slowly putting out new growth and seems to be recovering.

    Thanks for your help!
      • 1
      Pei I think this could be Edema which is a type of abnormal water retention in plants. It's often a sign over water OR too much moisture in the environment....
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  • What kind of cactus is this?
    Hi all- I inherited this cactus from my grandmother. It is 26 years old and as tall as me. Any ideas what kind it is? 
      • 1
      Pei Idk what this is, but would love me one :P
      • 1
      Paris Lalicata Hi [307330,Karly] ! This looks like a type of Hylocereus cactus to me- have you ever seen it produce white blooms? Or even fruit?
  • Calathea Medallion- Droopy leaves. Normal?
    Hi All, 

    My calathea medallion arrived in the mail about three days ago and it's looking a little sad! I watered it the day it arrived and it's been sitting on my window sill so it can get some sunlight. 

    Is this normal and if not, what do I do to make the leaves look perkier?

    Thanks in advance. 
      • 1
      Pei [307651,Bree] [307281,Emilie] calathea is quite sensitive with environmental changes. It's adjusting to their new environment which is why it's a bit droopy. Consider it was in a box, and god knows what kind of bumpy road it lived through, it actually looks pretty good :D To help a plant bounce back, you want to provide the best environment and care it needs. For calathea medallion you want to give it consistent indirect bright light (never direct sun as it gets burn easily specially in the summer) and water it once a week or every 10 days :) Hope this helps!
      • 1
      Bree This is so wierd because I have the same exact issue with my medallion that I just received. I emailed them and hopefully I can be pointed in the same direction.. I hope your plant recovers also.
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  • S.O.S
    Hello everyone, I have a palm that is on a slow decline. It currently sits in a west facing window and I try to water it 2x a week and mist occasionally. I also noticed some critters in the pot. Can some please help me figure out what is going on? Thanks!
      • 2
      Pei Palm is quite finicky just in general. They require high humidity that most indoor environment just don't have. I agreed with Paris that moving it a bit away from the window will help. You can also set up a humidifier or group your plants together to help the humidity level. Also, watering 2 times a week is a bit much. You can cut it down to 1 time a week. A general rule of thumb though is to always feel the soil-poke the soil at least 1-2inch deep-and make sure it's dry before you add more water. Hope this helps :)
      • 2
      Paris Lalicata Hi [307109,Chandra]! There's a chance the plant could either be declining due to moisture stress or too much sun. Palms are more shade loving plants that prefer bright indirect light, and considering a WF window can emit intense afternoon sun for about 4-6 hours this could be scorching the fronds. If you believe this to be the case I would either place a sheer curtain in front of the window to obstruct any intense rays from hitting the foliage. Or pulling the plant back from the window/moving it to a new spot! From there you'll want to adjust your waterings accordingly by allowing the top 2-3inches-half the soil dry out between. I would prune off any dead plant material to enhance the appearance as this will also help you monitor its health in the road ahead. Should bounce back and develop new growth slowly but surely :)
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  • Haworthia Cymbiformis Help
    I'm pretty sure my succulent is screwed. I just watered it and then was out of the office during a hear wave where my co worker watered it again because they were shutting of the air. It fell over - roots stuck in soil - now has almost no roots. Idk what to do. It was recommended that I take it out of the soil to dry for a couple of days so I took it out last night. https://t.co/YJy8LPMNGm
      • 1
      Pei oh no! It might be a goner :( overwater succulents are hard (almost impossible) to bounce back, unfortunately!
      • 2
      Paris Lalicata Hi [307107,Melissa Moon]- it sounds like the succulent may have declined due to root rot if it was over watered! After looking at the photo provided it's hard to say whether or not the plant will be able to bounce back. If there is any healthy roots left (even if they are super tiny) then there's a shot that this guy can make a comeback. If so I would re-pot it and give it plenty of bright indirect light to dappled sun. I would hold off on watering a few days to give the remaining roots time to breathe a little! From there I would go ahead and water the succulent and continue with the proper care. Overtime as long as it doesn't continue to decline then it should be on the right track to developing new roots, especially if the leaves plump back out. I would then increase the light levels if possible to more full sun if the plant has stabilized itself. That being said, in the event that there isn't much root development you can try your hand at propagating the leaves or any pups as long as they are still healthy! You can do this by gently removing them from the main stalk and allowing them to callous over, sticking the ends into a cacti mix, placing it in bright indirect/full sun, and water once the soil dries out. Overtime, roots should start to shoot out from the bottom where new growth will form!
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  • Seeking grow light recommendations!
    I just moved and my new place doesn't get as much bright direct light as my old one did. Does any one have any grow light brands they recommend? Thanks! 
      • 2
      Mr. Houseplant I can share a few grow light recommendations, I have been using them for the past couple of months. Soltech Solutions has beautiful lights, very strong. If you are looking for something more affordable Sansi produces very strong light bulbs. Both Soltech's (40W light) and Sansi's lights (the 36W bulb) give over 100,000 lux of light at 2 inches away, so they are very strong! You can keep most your plants at 1-2 feet away and they will still do well. Happy to answer any questions you might have :) Oh, and both lights are warm white (yellow), not purple
      • 1
      Pei [291209,Enid Hernandez] shared a few of her grow light picks with me the other day. Maybe she can help?
  • What are you actually supposed to do with dying leaves when you overwater?
    I overwatered my Alocasi 'polly' during the heatwave this weekend.

    It's shedding one of it's larger leaves that was actually already a bit damaged when I got it. Literally it's dripping water from the edge of the damaged leaf where it's rotting :( :(

    I'm resting the alocasia on a microfiber towel hoping to pull some of the excess water out of the soil. 

    Should I cut this leaf away or wait for it to die completely. It's a pretty large stem so am worried that will traumatize the plant more. 

    Thanks in advance!
      • 4
      Paris Lalicata Hi [295710,Colin Hart] ! Considering the yellowed leaf will only deteriorate overtime I would recommend simply removing this from the plant by pruning the stem close to the soil. Other than that the rest of your plant seems to be doing well! Just make sure it gets plenty of bright indirect light and you water when the soil has dried out completely :)
  • parlor palm leaning to one side
    I bought a parlor palm about a month ago and since I bought it, it's been kind of leaning to one side. Does anyone know why this might be happening and what I can do to help it thrive? Thanks!
      • 2
      Paris Lalicata Hi [306810,Isha] ! I agree with Erin the plant could be stretching towards the light source. If so, I would move the plant closer and rotate it daily so it's growth pattern can become more even! Also, looking a little closer the leaves appear to be turning a brownish color which could be an indication of moisture stress (either over or under watering). I would make sure the plant is receiving plenty of bright indirect light, and you water once the top 2-3 inches-half the soil has dried out. If it's still in it's plastic nursery container then I would transfer it into a planter that is 1-2 inches larger to ensure it has plenty of room to keep growing!
      • 1
      Erin It might be learning towards the light! You can try rotating it to see if it straightens out over time.
  • Dracaena Dorado -- over watered. Soil not drying out and now infested with fungu...
    Hi, I bought the Dracaena Dorado about four months ago. I made a mistake of over watering the plant a few weeks ago. I decided to let the soil dry out and haven't watered it since, but started noticing that the leaves have become droopy and withering in certain areas. The soil is still wet and now has become infested with fungus gnats. I added some H2O2 to the soil today to deal with the gnats.
    What should I do to save my plant?
      • 1
      Paris Lalicata Hi @Vitb! If you allowed the plant to dry out completely already and it's receiving sufficient bright indirect light it may be time to water the plant. Usually drooping leaves accompanied with browning/crisping is a sign a plant is staying dry for too long. Therefor, if the soil has dried out half way or completely the plant may be ready for a watering! If the planter you paired it with doesn't have a drainage hole it's good to remember to not pour more than 1/3 of the soils volume in water. This ensures a high excess of water isn't accumulating at the bottom and getting to the roots! This is basically imagining you are only pouring enough water to fill about a 1/3 of the containers size. I would remove any dead plant material to enhance the appearance and monitor the plants health moving forward! As for fungal gnats- I personally like to apply a 1-2 inch thick layer of sand as a top dressing for my plants. This prevents fungus gnats from breeding since they usually proliferate when the soil is too wet and generates excess fungus which is what they feed on (mostly caused by over watering plants). Using standard yellow sticky traps will help you capture the adults and monitor the population overtime as you eradicate them. I've also had a lot of success using Mosquito bits which is a natural bacteria that targets mosquito/gnat larvae and this can be incorporated into your soil and activates upon watering. Or you can pre-soak the bits for 20mins in a spray bottle and treat the plants this way! I have heard success with using a H202 solution, but if this doesn't seem to be helpful I would definitely recommend trying the methods above and see what happens :)
      • 1
      Jen Please report back if the H202 works. My birds nest fern recently got gnats and I do not know what to do!
      • 1
      Vitb I have attached some pics if that help address the issue.
      X
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  • Is something wrong with this plant?
    When I bought this plant it was only the leafy bottom part. Over time it started to grow up with these little springs. I’m not sure if that’s what it is suppose to do or it’s telling me it needs something. Help! 04Yp1-e4LgYQACbSIfLgjP2qw
      • 1
      Erin I could be wrong but I think those top soft spikes are the ripple peperomia's flowers? Either way it looks super happy and healthy!

      It might be getting slightly leggy because its search for a little more sunlight. Also looks like it could be repotted into a bigger pot soon - which is great!
      • 1
      Paris Lalicata Hi Abby! The Peperomias' new little springs you've noticed is actually new growth developing on the plant, and what appears to be the plants inflorescent (flower) at the tips! I would say the plant is letting you know that it's healthy and happy to be with you :)
      • 2
      Abby Here’s the plant
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  • Pilea Trouble
    Will post photo this evening!

    I have had my Pilea for about 6-7 months and it just can't seem to stabilize. 

    Currently, I have several leaves with brown/black edges that are dry and then the whole leaf drops off. At the same time I'm getting leaves curling that weren't curling to begin with. It's mid-summer and I've had some new growth, but now I'm afraid whatever condition isn't right is going to catch up to the new growth and kill it off.

    I've been very careful about not overwatering and I always wait until the soil is dry. It's in a room with an East facing window that gets bright light all day and direct sun part of the day. I had the plant in the window for a while but then I was worried about maybe too much sun and moved it about 4 feet from the window. It's in a ceramic pot with drainage in regular indoor plant potting soil.

    On some of the leaves, before the spots turned brown/black I could kind of see them as transparent/yellowish areas on the to-be-afflicted leaf. I'm down to 3-4 healthy leaves now and the ones that are new are not growing nearly as fast as they were earlier in the spring, which makes me think I'm definitely doing something wrong.

    Again, once I'm home tonight I'll post photos for additional info. Thank you!

    Oh, and if it helps at all, I have a Monstera plant in the same room under the same conditions, it sits about a foot from the window and is the happiest plant I have.
      • 1
      Pei Looks like you have great light, Michelle!
      • 1
      Erin Who makes that awesome pot?!
      • 1
      Paris Lalicata Hi Michelle! It looks like the Pilea could've been declining due to moisture stress, and if the soil was moist when you pulled it away from the light source that could've resulted in the yellowing leaves. Once a leaf yellows due to over watering it'll only decline over time which is why you noticed them eventually turning black/brown. I would say the best way to move forward is to place the Pilea back into an area that receives bright indirect light a few inches away from the window. Usually Pilea leaves will cup like how you see here when the light source is becoming too intense or the temperatures are hot! Therefor placing it in front of a window but only a few inches back from it should suffice. From there I would just monitor the plants response and only water once the soil has dried out completely :)
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  • Misting
    Hey y'all! What are the benefits of misting plants? Do you just spray the leaves or the soil, too? I've heard of and seen it done, but I am not sure exactly how it works.
      • 3
      Paris Lalicata Misting is usually more beneficial for humidity loving plants like Ferns and epiphytes like air plants. While it can be safe to mist your other plants it's best to know first if you have the right environmental conditions for the droplets to evaporate. If not- those water droplets can soak into the foliage and create lesions, or even allow room for bacterial/fungal infections to develop. However, as long as you have good air circulation or temperatures there should be no reason for concern! Also, since misting only boosts localized humidity around the plant for lets say 20mins this would require some serious daily misting if your plant is humidity sensitive. Therefor it's usually best to boost humidity by either using a humidifier, placing planters on wet pebble trays, or placing them in a bathroom that receives daily humidity from showers as long as there's a window :)
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  • Peace Lily
    Hi!
    I picked up this beauty about a month ago, and for the last two weeks maybe, the flowers have been getting brown spots like this. I've also noticed some browning on the tips of the leaves near the bottom of the plant. I try to water once a week and it it gets indirect sunlight through my blinds and front door for about 3-8 hours a day.
    I just need tips on keeping this beauty healthy and thriving. Thank you 😊
      • 2
      Paris Lalicata Hi [306631,Maranda] ! I agree with Pei the plant looks super happy and healthy despite the one bloom becoming spent (which is perfectly natural). The blooms can last anywhere from 1-2 months before beginning to die back, and since the rest of the plant is still producing blooms and looks perky I'd say she's all good to go :)
      • 1
      Maranda That helped a lot! Thank you so much 💞💞

      I havent ran the ac or heat since I got the plant, but I'll keep that in mind for when I do! 😊
      • 2
      Pei Hey [306631,Maranda] do you have photos of the whole plant? It's a bit difficult to tell the health of the plant now.
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