What plant is on your mind?

An area of The Sill dedicated to conversations about plants and gardening in the form of posted messages and threads.

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What plant is on your mind?

An area of The Sill dedicated to conversations about plants and gardening in the form of posted messages and threads.

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  • Blooming string of pearls
    Hi everyone! Just wanted to share my excitement 💛
  • Plant Swap Party in LA
    I just saw this event (<a href="https://www.eventbrite.com/e/sip-swap-plant-propagation-party-tickets-88930691091" title="Link: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/sip-swap-plant-propagation-party-tickets-88930691091">https://www.eventbrite.com/e/sip-swap-plant-propagation-party-tickets-88930691091</a>) on The Sill's Eventbrite page. Is anyone going? <br>
  • Unhappy Monstera
    <span>I've had this plant for a couple of months now and was excited to see a new leaf unfurling...but it just stopped unfurling and is turning black. A lower leaf is turning dark up the center of the leaf. I'm not able to find what is causing this online..is it too much water...not enough...something else? </span>
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      Nate Thanks, Paris and Pei! I am still working on this guy. Repotted in a smaller pot and after a few weeks it still isn't happy. I noticed that the watering I initially gave it has kept the soil very moist. I repotted it again tonight in dry potting mix and just a splash of water. I also put it in a grow bag vs. plastic pot, thinking maybe it would help with ventilation. Hoping this does the trick!
      • 2
      Paris Lalicata Hi Nate! It looks like it could be a moisture stress issue of either over or under watering. I would make sure the plant is exposed to as much bright indirect light as possible, and ensure the soil has dried out completely between waterings. Any damage on the leaves won't be able to bounce back, but they may not cause the rest of the leaves to decline! I would just monitor the new growth until it unfurls and matures, where then you can prune any damage leaf edges. The larger leaf I would just monitor as well but if you start to notice abut 50% of the leaf declining then it'd be wiser to remove the leaf, and allow the stem to die back gradually so the plant can take any available nutrients from within!
      • 2
      Pei Hi [295355,Nate], how much sun and water does it get? In general, if a plant is not getting enough light, it will not put out new growths (or will put out small new growths). but in your case, it's the new leave won't unfurl.
    • 1 more comment
  • YELLOW ZZPLANT
    my plant has singular leaves growing from the soil and they have since turned Yellow. one of them have white holes in them like it’s burned by a cig.What does the yellow signal ? <br><br>
      • 2
      Paris Lalicata Hi [307454,christelle] ! A common way ZZ plants are propagated are by their leaves, and the happy healthy growth that you notice have actually sprouted from the rhizomes beneath the soil that the larger leaves at the base created! Once those rhizomes are formed and new growth has developed the leaves at the base will eventually yellow and die off (which is what you see here). These can gently be plucked off, or you can wait for them to fall off on their own!
  • What Am I?
    Hi beauties!

    I picked up this little cutie at a second-hand store this morning and I'll be honest, I know nothing about it 💁‍♀️🤷‍♀️ but she's cute so i had tp have her!

    Can anyone tell me what kind of plant it is, and maybe a few tips on how to care for it?

    Thank you, thank you!
      • 1
      Maranda [286271,Paris Lalicata] [278958,Pei] you two are a god send! Thank you so much 💖🌿
      • 2
      Pei OMG they are so cuteeee! And I agree with Paris, it's an assorted succulents. The general rule of thumbs with succulents are lots of light (direct if possible) and water only if you see wrinkled leaves.
      • 2
      Paris Lalicata It actually looks like you may have an assortment of succulents in this container! The one in the middle appears to be a species of Sempervivum. The ones trailing off the sides look like it may be a species of Kalanchoe succulent as it matures and if it produces offsets on the edges of the leaves. And if I'm not mistaken it looks like there is another different looking succulent behind the Sempervivum which may be a Jade? Would need a closer look to be sure! Care for all of them however is the same- bright indirect light to full sun and only water once the soil has dried out completely!
    • 1 more comment
  • What kind of cactus is this?
    Hi all- I inherited this cactus from my grandmother. It is 26 years old and as tall as me. Any ideas what kind it is? 
      • 1
      Pei Idk what this is, but would love me one :P
      • 1
      Paris Lalicata Hi [307330,Karly] ! This looks like a type of Hylocereus cactus to me- have you ever seen it produce white blooms? Or even fruit?
  • Calathea Medallion- Droopy leaves. Normal?
    Hi All, <br><br>My calathea medallion arrived in the mail about three days ago and it's looking a little sad! I watered it the day it arrived and it's been sitting on my window sill so it can get some sunlight. <br><br>Is this normal and if not, what do I do to make the leaves look perkier?<br><br>Thanks in advance. 
      • 1
      Pei [307651,Bree] [307281,Emilie] calathea is quite sensitive with environmental changes. It's adjusting to their new environment which is why it's a bit droopy. Consider it was in a box, and god knows what kind of bumpy road it lived through, it actually looks pretty good :D To help a plant bounce back, you want to provide the best environment and care it needs. For calathea medallion you want to give it consistent indirect bright light (never direct sun as it gets burn easily specially in the summer) and water it once a week or every 10 days :) Hope this helps!
      • 1
      Bree This is so wierd because I have the same exact issue with my medallion that I just received. I emailed them and hopefully I can be pointed in the same direction.. I hope your plant recovers also.
    • 3 more comments
  • Monstera - Aerial Roots
    My Monstera is growing aerial roots- is it best to remove them or what do I do?
      • 1
      Pei it's best to leave it be! Plants shoot out aerial roots are normal cuz in their natural environment use it to detach themselves off the ground OR hang on to the tress. Hope this helps :)
      • 2
      Paris Lalicata Hi Jessica! Aerial roots are commonly found on Epiphytes (plants that grow on the body of other plants or supports) and help the plant cling to these hosts and can even help absorb moisture in the air. Since the Monstera deliciosa is an epiphyte in the wild- indoors their aerial roots can insert themselves into the soil for more support, or climb up fixtures. Training your Monstera to climb up a damp sphagnum moss pole can help encourage the plant to grow faster and larger as this is how they grow in their native habitat! This will also help give the plant more support as it grows and overtime the aerial roots will start climbing up it. Therefor these are a natural characteristic of the plant so they shouldn't be removed :)
  • Cat Likes Parlor Palm as Snack
    Seeking advice to prevent my cat from eating the little parlor palm I got from The Sill a couple weeks ago. By now, virtually all leaves have been eaten off (the palm is the one on the left on photo, but this was taken when it first arrived). I have tried spraying the palm with a vinegar and water mixture, but this only works while still wet. I have had to move the palm to a high-up shelf, which is not ideal for the plant or us.<br>Thanks for your help!
      • 1
      Colin Hart A couple thoughts!

      I have two cats and have just approached training them the same way I would dogs. Sometimes I think the myth that cat's are "untrainable" is a little self perpetuating. That being said I know my cats are up to no good when I'm not watching them or if I leave for the weekend haha.

      Point being would say don't shy away from trying to train them out of playing with it.

      All that being said.... Cats are cats and they do what they want haha.

      A big life saver for us in terms of training as well as just keeping cats away from or off places we don't want them is using the "ssst cat" https://www.amazon.com/PetSafe-PDT00-13914-SSSCAT-Spray-Deterrent/dp/B000RIA95G

      It's essentially a can of pressurized air with a motion sensor so when they get in range of where they shouldn't be it let's out a quick burst. You can direct the nozzle so it doesn't actually hit them.

      It's not perfect. I feel like it scares my roommates more often than my cats thus the air runs out faster than I'd like. But it has trained the cats to stay off counters and tables and better yet away from the plants! Added bonus is now they associate the canister with the hissing sound so even if it's out of air or battery the cats see it and stay away.
      • 1
      Jen Best of luck- my cat is especially fond of my parlor palm and has pulled it out of the pot repeatedly. I am at a loss.
      • 1
      Erin Such a great window! I'd test putting some cat grass on the sill next to the parlor.
    • 2 more comments
  • Propagating a leggy succulent
    Wanted to share my most recent propagation! I usually let leggy plants be but I was afraid this fella would break off because it was so small and fragile. Seems to be doing well and the leaves are starting to root. :) 
  • Stagnant Rubber tree plant
    This plant has had the same leaves and the “shoot” in the center for MONTHS! It hasn’t grown or shed any leaves. I moved it about 2 months ago to a window that gets a little more sun, but nothing has changed. Should I fertilize? Thanks in advance for your suggestions. 😊
      • 1
      Pei I agreed with [286271,Paris Lalicata]. It's definitely an light issue. Ficus loves bright light - 4-5 hours of direct sun would be best. In addition, variegated plants will need even more energy (light) to put out new growths/maintain the variegation. Hope this helps :-)
      • 1
      Paris Lalicata Hi [305302,Patti]! I personally have had the same experience with Ficus elastica in the past and found that ultimately like most plants- it's all about the light! The new growth has most likely been in limbo either because it's not getting enough light or enough water (if light levels are sufficient). I can already tell by the drooping petioles that the plant is ready for a drink! If you're having a hard time understanding the intensity of light in your home you can always download a free light meter app on your phone to measure. Anything below 50 foot candles will be too low to support plant growth- and a mature Ficus of this size should get anywhere between 130-250+ foot candles. Keep in mind that you'll receive different readings at different times of the day based on the location of the sun and the intensity of it. As long as the plant receives plenty of bright indirect light and water as soon as the soil has dried out the new growth should start to unfurl within a few weeks!
    • 1 more comment
  • Spots on Anthurium
    My Anthurium has these spots where it has lost color and dried out. I don't think it's because it's too dry. Maybe water quality or too much sun. Any ideas?
      • 1
      PlntNrd Yeah, I’m thinking it’s got to do with low humidity (unless you’re providing extra). These are tropical plants and need somewhat tropical conditions which means excess humidity. If you don’t have a humidifier near by, have it on a home made humidity tray, and don’t spritz it every day to couple of days, I would try, at least, one of those things. Rather than distilled water, you might instead try spring water. Distilled is totally pure and doesn’t have any minerals added (which houseplants appreciate).
      • 1
      Jenny Zhou I've moved it a foot or so away from the window last week. No new dried spots so far, fingers-crossed. If that doesn't work, I'll try distilled water. Let me know how things go!
      • 1
      MALINDA Mine is doing the same thing. I'm going to see if it's the humidity. O have it in bright indirect light in a well draining soil mix. I might also switch to distilled water.
  • What am I?
    Hi guys! What kind of plant is this? And how do I keep it alive???
      • 2
      PlntNrd As Berna said, it’s an Anthurium and, I must say, it’s quite beautiful! The leaves almost look like wax.
      • 1
      Berna y Alba Hi Madison! This is an Anthurium and it's a tropical plant, so you need to apply with it some tropical plant's ground rules. First, never direct light, they prefer medium to low light. Then, the envirenment should be as humid as possible (I know sometimes is hard!), so you could help it with a humidifier or putting a water vase or something near it. Get it confy in a place with other plants near, as in a plant gang, is very helpful to mantain humidity levels. Last but not least, you have to avoid overwatering it, so wait untill the soil is dry to water it.
      Those are the rules that I have for my tropical ones! You could go to my ig @bernayalba if you want to see more tips that I've posted already there.
      Hope my comment was helpful!
    • 1 more comment
  • New Pilia babies!
    So much new growth from my pilia 
      • 1
      PlntNrd Oh, congrats! It’s so exciting, right?!? Mine gave me one, and then another, and then suddenly there was four!! It was so exciting, every week there was a new one, to my surprise, so I’m sure you’re super excited right now too. Do you know if you’re going to separate them eventually or let them be?
      • 1
      Pei 😍😍😍! Pilea is famous for growing very fast that people often give the pups/cuttings to loved ones. Hence their nickname is friendship plant!
  • Unknown Plant
    <b>Does anyone know what this plant is? It was given to me, and I have no idea how to care for it, since I don't know what it is! I am very new to gardening, and want to make sure I get it right! </b><b></b>
      • 3
      jenna Bromeliad! They like bright light and to dry out between waterings. They are technically epiphytes, like orchids, so don’t naturally grow in soil, and have relatively shallow roots. Don’t let them live in soggy soil. Watering once a week or two while letting the water run out should be good enough. One thing to know is that after they flower, the mom plant usually dies, and will channel the energy into producing a pup. So if that happens, don’t panic. :)