Red Aglaonema Problem
My Red Aglaonema has been doing well for months with lots of growth. Yesterday I noticed the leaves drooping a bit for the first time. This morning I went to check on it and I don't know how to describe it other than it seems like the entire main stalk was able to pull right out of the soil as if it was simply just pushed into the soil in the first place. Really strange. <br><br>Any ideas what is happening? Is this a natural occurrence with them once they get past a certain size? Is there a way to save that part?
    • 1
    Paris Lalicata If your plant has root rot you can simply take cuttings from all the healthy parts of the plant! Eventually you'll have a few brand new plant babies for free and don't really lose your plant!
    • 1
    PlntNrd Is it possible for you to post a few pics? I know that some plants, like Sempervivum literally pull themselves out of the soil when they’re overwatered (kind of sounds like what you’re describing), but I don’t know of this being common with Aglaonemas. I have quite a few Aglos and I haven’t personally seen this phenomenon, so if you could post a few pics it might help the forum members identify the issue.
    • 1
    Andrea Hi!
    I’m not super familiar with this particular plant, but it sounds like it could be root rot that caused the stalk to separate from the root ball. In winter you should let the soil dry completely between watering. Supposedly the red vatiety is more “delicate” than the others and can be finicky about humidity and warmth during colder months. I’ve also read that during propagation they can take a very long time to root while still showing significant leaf growth, so that could be the case here. 🤔🌱
      • 1
      Plants_Armstrong This makes sense to me. I'm just surprised by it since it looked so healthy otherwise. I wonder if I can put some rooting hormone on it and get it to re-root again. I guess it's worth a try.
        • 1
        Pei Thanks [287148,Andrea] !

        I would hold off on rooting hormone. I read that any chemical treatments are only good for when your plants are in good health. It would add more stress for unhappy plants to deal with it. (just like people, huh? lol)
          • 1
          Plants_Armstrong I see. Yeah I just figured that this single stalk that it happened to is now basically just like a stem clipping. If you looked it you'd probably have no idea it wasn't attached to anything. Your point makes sense, but on the other hand, if I do nothing I think there is no other chance for it but to remove it and toss it, right?
            • 1
            Andrea Rooting them is supposed to be as simple as taking a clipping that has at least 4-5 leaves and placing it in soil. Indirect bright light and temps of 68+ are supposed to promote re-rooting within 2-4 weeks. If you’re concerned it could rot and affect the rest of your plant, you could always re-root it into its own container for now. 🤞🏼🌱
            • 0 1 vote
    • 1
    Pei My aglaonema sarah is doing exactly the same thing!!!! :(
      • 1
      Plants_Armstrong What gives??? It looks totally fine otherwise and there are several new smaller sprouts around it. Did it just get too big for itself and the stem rotted / lost strength?

      It feels as if it never had roots at all and someone just chopped it off another plant and shoved it in the dirt. So strange.