Ashley
 
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  • Fiddle Fig Troubleshooting
    Hi! I rescued this fiddle fig exactly a month ago from my local nursery. It came with the brown stops on the lower leaves but overall I loved it to so much I brought it home. What I noticed is that it has these tiny holes in some of the leaves and I am not sure if it is pests or moisture loss? I wipe the leaves with water and soap once a week and have not found any pests. However last time I watered it (6 days ago) I saw a small white worm (larvae looking) come out of the drainage hole!! But I haven't seen flies or anything so what is the best way to treat it? Originally I had it probably 20 feet from a west facing window for 3 weeks and realized that was not the best spot as other leaves are turning a little brown so now I have it right in front of another west facing window by itself. So I fixed the light issue if it was that.  Watering isn't an issue because since I got it, I knew how particular it was about water so I use the moisture meter to check when it needs water and make sure not to overwater! I do not want to repot it because I am scared it would go into shock. Also, I already removed 2 leaves 2 weeks apart so it doesn't go into shock. I appreciate any help I can get and look forward to the Q&A on Instagram on Thursday. Thank you.
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      Paris Lalicata Hi Ashley! The holes on the foliage don't look concerning. They either appear to be leaf splitting due to either an arid environment or mechanical damage. Fiddles shouldn't be placed in a high traffic area as they don't like their leaves constantly being brushed up against. It's perfectly natural for plants to drop a few leaves as they acclimate into a new environment, especially if you change its position several times within the home. Therefor, as long as you maintain the right balance of care the plant should continue to thrive! It sounds like the bugs in the soil could be some sort of garden centipede which are completely harmless to you and your plants, and just feed off of excess organic material within the soil. The best way to get rid of these guys is to simply dispose of all the older soil when you transfer this plant into a container that is 1-2 inches larger with fresh soil since they can't live in those plastic containers indefinitely. Hope this helps!
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      Ashley xx
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